Building the house on rock

Whitefriars Church of England Primary Academy

Seven signs a child is suffering from Covid related Stress

Here are some of the key symptoms of stress to look out for:

  1. Changes in behaviour (e.g. restlessness and finding it hard to relax, hitting out, withdrawing, spending more time alone or being more clingy than normal, crying)
  2. Changes in sleep patterns (e.g. sleeping a lot more or a lot less than usual, having trouble getting to sleep or waking during the night or very early, younger children may find it harder to settle in the evening, nightmares may be experienced)
  3. Changes in social relationships and activities (e.g. a loss of interest in contacting friends or family, not engaging in the hobbies, lacking motivation in attending school or homework)
  4. Changes in eating patterns (e.g. eating a lot more than usual or a lot less, an increase in comfort eating and wanting more treats and snacks)
  5. Changes in mood and thinking patterns (e.g. feeling low, sad and hopeless about the future, feeling unable to cope, angry or frustrated, being more irritable, thinking or talking more about death and dying, experiencing more extreme 'catastrophic' ways of thinking, "life will never be good again, we have nothing to look forward to")
  6. Changes in self-care (e.g. not taking care of their appearance in the normally way, showing less interest in their personal hygiene, less concern about eating and exercising)
  7. Changes in coping strategies (e.g. using unhelpful coping strategies such as alcohol, drugs or nicotine, hurting  or talking about wanting to harm themselves, taking more risks)

How you can help

It is important to keep the lines of communication open with your children and allow them to talk about how they are feeling, as this gives an opportunity for them to: express themselves; feel understood; and gain support from you. Just being there to listen when children talk can help them to make sense of their thoughts and feelings and this can reduce feelings of confusion, stress and hopelessness. Knowing that it is normal to feel scared and worried in such uncertain times can be very validating and knowing that there are ways to tolerate these feelings and improve our mood can help to build hope and resilience.

If there are changes in their mood, thinking patterns or behaviour which may indicate an increase in risk (such as self-harm, thoughts of suicide or self-neglect) it is important to seek help and advice from your GP immediately. If you think your child may be in crisis, you can call the First

Response 24/7 helpline which offers immediate advice, support and signposting for people with mental health difficulties of any age. Call 0808 196 3494.

There are many organisations offering excellent advice, support and webinars during this very difficult time

www.youngminds.org.uk

www.annafreud.org/coronavirus-support/support-for-parents-and-carers/

www.mind.org.uk/information-support/for-children-and-young-people/coronavirus/

www.wellbeingnands.co.uk

www.Kooth.com

 

 

 

Supporting Parents to Access Childcare - New Video

The Professional Association of Childcare and Early Years (PACEY) has just developed a new video – 'Supporting Parents to Access Childcare (link is external)'.  It has now been posted on PACEY’s JCP resource page. 

This video helps parents to understand the benefits of childcare to their child’s development and encourages them to take advantage of the childcare offer even if they are “stay at home” parents. It also explains how they can access funding.

This is an excellent tool to help reassure parents who are nervous about using a childcare provider. It’s very short and easy to understand.

 

 

Healthy Start Voucher Scheme - England and Wales

This is a scheme for pregnant women or parents who have a child under 4 years old. The vouchers can be used to buy milk, fresh or frozen fruit and veg and formula milk.

This scheme offers support to some of our most vulnerable families and Work Coaches are encouraged to promote to appropriate customers. Find out more (link is external).

 

 

Here are some of the key symptoms of stress to look out for:

  1. Changes in behaviour (e.g. restlessness and finding it hard to relax, hitting out, withdrawing, spending more time alone or being more clingy than normal, crying)

  2. Changes in sleep patterns (e.g. sleeping a lot more or a lot less than usual, having trouble getting to sleep or waking during the night or very early, younger children may find it harder to settle in the evening, nightmares may be experienced)

  3. Changes in social relationships and activities (e.g. a loss of interest in contacting friends or family, not engaging in the hobbies, lacking motivation in attending school or homework)

  4. Changes in eating patterns (e.g. eating a lot more than usual or a lot less, an increase in comfort eating and wanting more treats and snacks)

  5. Changes in mood and thinking patterns (e.g. feeling low, sad and hopeless about the future, feeling unable to cope, angry or frustrated, being more irritable, thinking or talking more about death and dying, experiencing more extreme 'catastrophic' ways of thinking, "life will never be good again, we have nothing to look forward to")

  6. Changes in self-care (e.g. not taking care of their appearance in the normally way, showing less interest in their personal hygiene, less concern about eating and exercising)

  7. Changes in coping strategies (e.g. using unhelpful coping strategies such as alcohol, drugs or nicotine, hurting  or talking about wanting to harm themselves, taking more risks)

How you can help

It is important to keep the lines of communication open with your children and allow them to talk about how they are feeling, as this gives an opportunity for them to: express themselves; feel understood; and gain support from you. Just being there to listen when children talk can help them to make sense of their thoughts and feelings and this can reduce feelings of confusion, stress and hopelessness. Knowing that it is normal to feel scared and worried in such uncertain times can be very validating and knowing that there are ways to tolerate these feelings and improve our mood can help to build hope and resilience.

If there are changes in their mood, thinking patterns or behaviour which may indicate an increase in risk (such as self-harm, thoughts of suicide or self-neglect) it is important to seek help and advice from your GP immediately. If you think your child may be in crisis, you can call the First

Response 24/7 helpline which offers immediate advice, support and signposting for people with mental health difficulties of any age. Call 0808 196 3494.

There are many organisations offering excellent advice, support and webinars during this very difficult time

www.youngminds.org.uk

www.annafreud.org/coronavirus-support/support-for-parents-and-carers/

www.mind.org.uk/information-support/for-children-and-young-people/coronavirus/

www.wellbeingnands.co.uk

www.Kooth.com

Supporting Parents to Access Childcare - New Video

The Professional Association of Childcare and Early Years (PACEY) has just developed a new video – 'Supporting Parents to Access Childcare (link is external)'.  It has now been posted on PACEY’s JCP resource page. 

This video helps parents to understand the benefits of childcare to their child’s development and encourages them to take advantage of the childcare offer even if they are “stay at home” parents. It also explains how they can access funding.

This is an excellent tool to help reassure parents who are nervous about using a childcare provider. It’s very short and easy to understand.

Healthy Start Voucher Scheme - England and Wales

This is a scheme for pregnant women or parents who have a child under 4 years old. The vouchers can be used to buy milk, fresh or frozen fruit and veg and formula milk.

This scheme offers support to some of our most vulnerable families and Work Coaches are encouraged to promote to appropriate customers. Find out more (link is external).